By Faith: Abel

‘Mericans are exceptional in the depressing sport of Foodball. Like, we literally take food and shoot it in the hoop that is the kitchen waste basket. If we are honest, we splurge on way too much food for the one or two meals we have in mind for the week. We get in the lab that is our kitchen to innovate an Instagram-worthy dish that will dazzle our family and friends #Delicious. Then we are either ill-equipped to creatively use left-overs or we lazily let the unused groceries hang out until the marked day of their calculated death and they are tossed to the curb.

We are really good at thinking of ourselves first.

In terms of food, this is clearly true in the US. As I said, most of us buy too much, accomplish what we set out to do with the ingredients, and waste the rest. According to Feeding America, there is an estimated 70 billion pounds of food waste in America each year. I don’t even have a word for how stunning that number is. What a waste of resources and an assault on God’s blessing.

A man by the name of Abel knew not to offend God with his first-fruits and only serve himself. Hebrews 11:4 references the early Genesis story – “By faith Abel offered to God a more acceptable sacrifice than Cain, through which he was commended as righteous, God commending him by accepting his gifts.” Genesis 4 tells us that Abel was the keeper of sheep and his brother Cain was responsible for working the ground. So a shepherd and a farmer walk into Garden Bar and. . . nevermind. . . So Cain the farmer’s love for God and his respect for his resources lacked considerably compared to his brother Abel the shepherd. Their story goes something like this:

“In the course of time Cain brought to the LORD an offering of the fruit of the ground, and Abel also brought the firstborn of his flock and their fat portions. And the LORD had regard for Abel and his offering, but for Cain and his offering he had no regard. So Cain was very angry and his face fell” (Genesis 4:3-5).

We could unpack this like so: Abel immediately thanked the Lord for what was given to him as blessing by offering the first and best of what he received back to the One who gave it to him in the first place. His heart was oriented towards the hand of the Lord, the Giver of good gifts. Meanwhile Cain, lacking affinity for the Lord and selfish in his heart, checked his “giving back to God” chore list off by offering his left-overs.

The American issue I mentioned before, does it sound more like it comes from a heart and thought process like Cain or Abel? And for you, just you personally – are you offering your very best to God from a depth of love, purity and thankfulness to our Lord or are you bringing him a to-go box with what you could find nearing its expiration date?

We should long for God to be pleased with the offering of our lives (and stop dropping so much money at the grocery store like dang!). . .  Allow God to put his Extra on your ordinary as he did with Abel. By faith.

Chad Painter

Chad Painter

I'm a Career Consultant and Middle School Ministry Direction in Cleveland attending Eternity Bible College online.
Chad Painter

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